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City of Tigard

Funding the Future

TYPES OF REVENUE AND WHERE IT GOES

Types Of Revenue

TYPES OF REVENUE AND WHERE IT GOES

  • About 3/4’s of the City’s revenue is restricted.
  • Restricted revenue can only be used for specific/designated purposes.
  • Some common examples of restricted revenue are seen on your monthly utility bill; these are the fees for:
    • Water
    • Sewer
    • Stormwater management
    • Street Maintenance
    • Parks & Recreation
  • Restricted revenues cannot be used to pay for General Fund Services.

TIGARD GENERAL FUND: REVENUE VS EXPENSE

Revenue vs Expense
TIGARD GENERAL FUND: REVENUE VS EXPENSE

Property taxes make up 44 percent of the City of Tigard’s General Fund Revenue (In 2016 that 44 percent equaled $14.3 million.)

The largest portion of Tigard’s General Fund expenses (47 percent) goes to the Tigard Police Department. (In 2016, the expenses for the Tigard Police Department equaled $14.9 million.)

"Other" expenses, which account for 17 percent of the General Fund Expenses include:

  • Capital Projects
  • Municipal Court
  • City Council

The "Fees, Licenses, Permits and Fines" that make up 36 percent of the city’s General Fund Revenue include:

  • Franchise Fees from utilities – for using the city’s right-of-way
  • Traffic Fines
  • Business Licenses
  • Land use fees

The "Federal, State and Local Sources and Grants" section includes revenue from WCCLS and Tigard’s share of state taxes.

Background Materials

Advisory Team
Levy and Bond Advisory Task Force

At Your Service
Staff Profiles

Your Property Tax Dollars

Your Property Taxes
Did you know... 

  • Tigard’s property tax rate is the second lowest of cities in Washington County with a population over 5,000.
  • The average household in Tigard pays about $4,000 per year in property taxes, but only 17 percent of that (approximately $680) goes to the city and, as you might imagine, that doesn’t cover all the costs of services like police, parks and recreation, library and infrastructure.
  • In community surveys people tell us they are very satisfied with city services and believe they receive good value for their taxes. We want to continue providing the high levels of service the community expects and values, but our costs are going up faster than our revenues.
  • We invite you to learn more about Tigard’s budget challenges and share your thoughts about what’s important to you and sustainable solutions for a financially healthy future.

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Your City in 60 Seconds
Your City in 60

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