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Defining Tigard: Summerlake Park
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23 Sep 2014  
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Water Meter Information

Water Meter Sales
Water meters may be purchased at the Tigard City Hall Utility Billing Counter located at 13125 SW Hall Blvd.:

  • Mondays: Noon–4 p.m.

  • Tuesdays: 8 a.m.–Noon


  • Download the Purchasing Water Meters form.



    Checking for Leaks
    Your water meter is the best detective in your home. It can tell whether you have a leak, as well as how much water various appliances are using. All you have to do is learn its language. City of Tigard water customers have meters that measure cubic feet of water used. To convert cubic feet of water into gallons multiply the number shown on your meter by 7.48.

    An example: 004900 cubic feet x 7.48 = 36,652 gallons.

    Water meters never reset. To find out how much water you've used in any given period, just subtract the number of cubic feet used on your last bill from the current meter reading. Looking at the meter you will see a red sweep needle. This needle turns like a second hand clock. Each time it goes around, one cubic foot of water (7.48 gallons) is used. Also the meter has a leak detection device on the face. This is a small triangle shaped dial that has no cubic feet value but will detect small flows of water through the meter.

    Now, go do some checking:
    1. Turn on the sprinkler and watch the meter dial move for 1 minute. Multiply the number of cubic feet times 60 for the quantity used per hour. Then estimate how long you usually leave the sprinkler running. This will give you an idea of how many gallons of water you use each time you sprinkle.
    2. Wait for a member of the family to step into the shower and follow the directions above. You will know how many gallons are used for each shower.
    3. For leak detection, turn everything off carefully so no water is being used anywhere in the house, then note the position of the meter dial. Look at the leak detection triangle for movement. Don't use any water and check the meter dial again after 20 minutes. If the triangle has not moved, you have a relatively water-tight home. If it has moved, start checking hose connections, faucets, and toilets.
    If you have any further questions regarding your water meter or leaks, please contact the Utility Billing office, 503-718-2460. If you have experienced a leak you may be eligible for an adjustment to your utility account, see the section under Utility Billing titled Credit for Leak Adjustment.


    Keep Water Meters Accessible
    Water customers are asked to ensure there is easy access to water meters located on their property. Easy access to your water meter enables Tigard staff to read your meter, perform repairs and routine maintenance and to turn the water off in the event of a leak or other water emergency.

    Many water meters throughout the water service area are obscured or are difficult to access due to overgrown vegetation, fencing, landscape walls and other obstacles. A minimum clearance of two feet is required around water meter boxes and there must be a clear, direct path from the street to the meter.

    For more information contact Water Operations Supervisor Sam Morrison at 503-718-2600.

    Now you be the meter reader!
    The next time you're working in the yard, take a few minutes and check out the area around your meter.
    • Is it easily seen from the street?
    • Do you have to push shrubs or tree limbs out of the way to get to it?
    • Do you have to duck down or crawl to read it?
    If any of these are true, our meter reader will have trouble reading your meter. Feel free to call our office for advice on maintaining your meter, 503-718-2460.


    Pressure Related Problems
    Occasionally you may experience a decrease or increase in the water pressure. There are many possible causes of this problem including air in the water lines, faulty plumbing fixtures, or a defective pressure regulating valve.

    Air in the lines is usually associated with construction in the area or a change in your water supply, such as the meter being turned off for repairs. Symptoms of air pockets include water "spitting" out of the faucet, cloudy or milky looking water, and possibly water that appears rusty. If you experience any of these things turn at least two faucets on full blast for 5-10 minutes; it's helpful if the faucets are located at different ends of the house. This should pull the air pocket through the water lines, however, if the problem doesn't clear up call the Water Division at 503-718-2591.

    If you are experiencing low pressure in one area of the home, it is probably related to a faulty plumbing fixture. For instance, if the kitchen sink works fine but the clothes washer takes a long time to fill, the problem is probably in the line to the washer or the washer itself. The same can be said of individual problems with showers, toilets, sinks, etc. If this sounds like the problem you are having, you'll want to contact a plumber or make the repair yourself.

    Another common pressure problem can be attributed to a bad pressure regulator. If the pressure seems unusually low throughout the house or if your pipes tend to rattle when certain fixtures are used, you may need to repair or replace your regulator valve.


    Reading the Water Meter:
    Simple instructions for reading your meter can be found in the section, Checking for Leaks.

    Meters are read monthly for billing purposes. We do not estimate the reads for billing unless we are physically unable to read the meter. Generally, this is limited to meters that have been blocked by vehicles or cannot be located because of excavation in the surrounding area. Consumption is measured and billed in units of one hundred cubic feet (ccf).

    Each week we read approximately 2,000 meters during a three day period and we pride ourselves on maintaining an error rate of less than .1%. However, there will be times when a meter is misread. If you find that the current read on your bill does not match the read on your water meter, call our office for an adjustment, 503-718-2460.


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      Back to Utility Billing page...
      Checking for Leaks
      Keep Water Meters Accessible
      Pressure Related Problems
      Reading the Water Meter
      Pay Your Utility Bill online
      Credit for Leak Adjustment
      Water Rates and Information
    Utility Billing Office: 503-718-2460
    Business Hours: Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

    Emergencies:
    To report water, stormwater, sewer, street or park emergencies during regular business hours, contact Public Works staff at 503-718-2591.

    After-hours answering service can be reached at 503-639-1554.

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    CONTACT US
    City of Tigard, 13125 SW Hall Blvd, Tigard, OR 97223
    Automated Phone Attendant: 503-639-4171
    Additional Contact Information | Map and Directions | Location and Hours of Operation


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