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23 Nov 2014  
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Tigard and Lake Oswego - The Facts about a Water Partnership Agreement


Get the latest details on the LO/Tigard Water Partnership.


The City of Tigard and Lake Oswego have entered into a water partnership agreement to jointly:

  • Expand Lake Oswego's water treatment facility.
  • Replace the existing river intake.
  • Construct a reservoir.
  • Upsize transmission lines.
  • Develop existing water rights and permits on the Clackamas River.
The improvements would allow Tigard and Lake Oswego to produce up to 38 million gallons of water per day. Of this amount, Tigard would receive between 14 and 20 million gallons per day.

Click to view:
The water partnership agreement is scheduled to be considered by both the Tigard City Council and the Lake Oswego City Council on August 5, 2008.

Benefits of the Tigard and Lake Oswego water partnership
  • Quantity - Depending upon future water demand, this source, along with Tigard's groundwater and aquifer storage and recovery wells, is expected to produce enough water to meet the needs of Tigard water customers from the year 2016 to approximately 2035.

  • Quality, Taste and Appearance - Under the water partnership agreement, Lake Oswego's existing water treatment plant will be transformed to a state-of-the-art facility. The new facility will:
    • employ the latest water treatment technologies.
    • provide greater control over water quality.
    • be better equipped to address future testing/treatment requirements and issues related to aesthetics, such as taste and appearance.


    The Clackamas River is an excellent raw water source and has a 100-year history of supplying water to an ever-increasing population. This source, when coupled with a state-of-the-art water treatment facility, will provide Tigard water customers with a reliable, high-quality water supply for years to come.

  • Cost and Rates - Developing a new water source will be costly. The projects associated with the water partnership are estimated to cost $136 million. Tigard's share of the improvements and cost to buy into Lake Oswego's existing system is estimated to be $81 million. Although expensive, the Lake Oswego water partnership is the least expensive option of all those considered.

    By developing our own infrastructure (treatment plant, transmission pipes, intake, etc.), a portion of the project costs can be collected from future development. Although this will help to offset steep increases in water rates, Tigard water customers can expect rates to nearly double over the next ten years as improvements are brought online. Following the initial ten-year investment, water rates are expected to stabilize or even decrease slightly. In comparison, if Tigard simply continued to purchase water via the Portland Water Purchase Agreement, water customers could expect to see their water rates triple over the same time period.

Why do we need more water?
The Tigard Water Service Area (TWSA) includes the cities of Durham, King City, two-thirds of Tigard and unincorporated areas to the south and west of Tigard. The City of Tigard is the water provider for the TWSA and entities within this partnership are represented by the Intergovernmental Water Board.

Click to view:
  • Map of the Tigard Water Service Area


  • The TWSA's peak water demand can reach 13 million gallons a day, but as the population continues to increase, that number is expected to reach 20 million gallons a day by the year 2040. Currently, the service area receives its water from several sources, but these sources aren't capable of meeting the growing demand for water.

    Tigard water customers excel at water conservation; over the past year, water customers have actually decreased their water consumption from 88 to 84 gallons per person per day. But as the area's population continues to grow, future water demand will be too great to simply conserve our way out of the problem.

    What options were considered?
    The City of Tigard and Intergovernmental Water Board partners Durham, King City and the Tigard Water District have studied these potential drinking water sources:
    • Lake Oswego Expansion & Water Partnership
      Water Source: Clackamas River


    • Tualatin Basin Water Supply Project (Also known as the Hagg Lake Dam raise project)
      Water Source: Trask and Tualatin Rivers


    • Willamette River Treatment & Transmission Improvement Project
      Water Source: Willamette River


    • Purchase City of Portland Water
      Water Source: Bull Run Watershed

    Of these options, the Lake Oswego Expansion & Water Partnership appears to hold the most promise of supplying the majority of our future water needs.

    How did the water partnership agreement come about?
    September 2005
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego completed the Water Supply Feasibility Project study. This study concluded that it would be possible for Lake Oswego and Tigard to jointly develop Lake Oswego's capital infrastructure and remaining water rights. Both parties would benefit from such a partnership. Tigard would establish ownership in a future water source; Lake Oswego would protect its water rights and reduce costs since Tigard would fund a portion of the improvements.

    Click to view:
  • Water Supply Feasibility Project Study



  • March 2006
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego funded the Joint Water Supply System Analysis. This plan investigated the technical, financial and legal issues influencing the potential partnership. Ultimately, the plan concluded Tigard and Lake Oswego would each benefit from jointly expanding the Lake Oswego water system.

    Click to view:
  • The Joint Water Supply System Analysis
  • The Executive Summary of the Water Supply System Analysis



  • November 2006
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego and the Intergovernmental Water Board held a joint meeting to have a preliminary discussion of the water partnership and provide input on the Joint Water Supply System Analysis.

    Click to view:
  • Minutes of the November 14, 2006 meeting



  • July 2007
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego and the Intergovernmental Water Board held a joint meeting to receive the preliminary results of the Joint Water Supply System Analysis. Based on the analysis, these agencies recognized the potential advantages of the water partnership. Representatives from each of the parties formed a work group to further explore the water partnership.

    Click to view:
  • Minutes of the July 17, 2007 meeting



  • December 2007
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego and the Intergovernmental Water Board entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) developed by the work group. The MOU:
    1. Committed the parties to work cooperatively, through staff, to develop an agreement detailing the terms of a water supply partnership.
    2. Identified specific issues for discussion.
    3. Committed to a mutually agreeable recommendation by June 2008.
    4. Pledged mutual support of Lake Oswego's efforts to secure extensions of its water rights.
    Click to view:
  • Memorandum of Understanding



  • April 2008
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego and the Intergovernmental Water Board held a joint meeting to discuss the major points of the water partnership agreement.

    Click to view:
  • Minutes of the April 15, 2008 meeting



  • May 2008
    The City of Tigard held an open house to educate and seek the input of Tigard water customers.


    July 2008
    The Intergovernmental Water Board held a public hearing and unanimously adopted a resolution recommending the City of Tigard approve the water partnership agreement.

    Click to view:
  • "Water Partnership Agreement" formally known as the Intergovernmental Agreement Regarding Water Supply Facilities, Design, Construction, and Operation



  • August 2008
    The Cities of Tigard and Lake Oswego are scheduled to consider the water partnership agreement on August 5, 2008.

    Click to view:
  • "Water Partnership Agreement" formally known as the Intergovernmental Agreement Regarding Water Supply Facilities, Design, Construction, and Operation





  • - - -
    Source Documents:
    Future Water Sources:
    As the water provider for the Tigard Water Service Area (TWSA), the City of Tigard has created a 10-minute video presentation on future water sources.

    This educational video discusses the TWSA’s projected water demand, the process for identifying future water sources, the pros and cons of these sources, and how water customers can get involved.






    CONTACT US
    City of Tigard, 13125 SW Hall Blvd, Tigard, OR 97223
    Automated Phone Attendant: 503-639-4171
    Additional Contact Information | Map and Directions | Location and Hours of Operation


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