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  • Cool Off

Emergency Management

Be Prepared for the Heat


Heat Wave Expected
WEATHER | AIR QUALITY


LOCAL PLACES TO STAY COOL...

STAY COOL TIPS...

  • Wear Appropriate Clothing: Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
  • Stay Cool Indoors: Stay in an air-conditioned place as much as possible.
  • Schedule Outdoor Activities Carefully: Try to limit your outdoor activity to when it’s coolest, like morning and evening hours.
  • Pace Yourself: Cut down on exercise during the heat.
  • Wear Sunscreen: Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool down and can make you dehydrated.
  • Do Not Leave Children or Pet in Cars: Cars can quickly heat up to dangerous temperatures, even with a window cracked open.
  • Avoid Hot and Heavy Meals: They add heat to your body!


STAY HYDRATED...Summer Heat

  • Drink Plenty of Fluids: Drink more fluids, regardless of how active you are. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Replace Salt and Minerals: Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body that need to be replaced. A sports drink can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat.
  • Keep Your Pets Hydrated: Provide plenty of fresh water for your pets, and leave the water in a shady area.


STAY INFORMED...

  • Check for Updates: Check your local news for extreme heat alerts and safety tips and to learn about any cooling shelters in your area.
  • Know the Signs: Learn the signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses and how to treat them.
  • Monitor Those at High Risk: Although anyone at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others:
    • Infants and young children
    • People 65 years of age or older
    • People who are overweight
    • People who overexert during work or exercise
    • People who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure, or who take certain medications, such as for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation

For more details, visit https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/heattips.html.

STAY COOL IN WASHINGTON COUNTY

  • Beaverton City Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Friday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Saturday, and 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. on Sunday. The library is located at 12375 SW 5th Street.
  • Beaverton City Library at Murray Scholls will be open from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Wednesday and 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. The library is located at 11200 SW Murray Scholls Place, Suite 102.
  • Boys & Girls Aid Safe Place for Youth will be open from 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Sunday. Meals, snacks, and water are available on site. Hot weather supplies are available, e.g. hats, sunscreen, and clothing. Youth may participate in daily programming and recreational activities. Safe Place for Youth is located at 454 SE Washington Street in Hillsboro. TriMet route numbers: 46, 47, 48, and 57 plus MAX
  • Cornelius Public Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Saturday, and 12 p.m. – 5 p.m. on Sunday. The library is located at 1355 N Barlow Street. TriMet route numbers: 57
  • Hillsboro Brookwood Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Water will be available. The library is located at 2850 Brookwood Parkway. TriMet route numbers: 46 and 48
  • Hillsboro Community Senior Center will be open on 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The senior center is located at 750 SE 8th Avenue. TriMet route numbers: 46, 47, 48, and 57
  • Hillsboro Police Department will be opening their doors from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Police Department is located at 250 SE 10th Avenue in Hillsboro.
  • Hillsboro Shute Park Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Water will be available. The library is located at 775 SE 10th Avenue. TriMet route numbers: 46, 47, 48 and 57
  • Hillsboro Shute Park Aquatic & Recreation Center (SHARC), lobby area will be open from 5:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, and 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. on Sunday. Water will be available. The SHARC is located at 953 SE Maple Street. TriMet route numbers: 46, 47, 48 and 57
  • Sherwood Regional Family YMCA, will be open from 5 a.m. – 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. The YMCA is located at 23000 SW Pacific Highway.
  • Tigard Public Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 12 p.m. – 6 p.m. on Sunday. The library is located at 13500 SW Hall Blvd.
  • Tualatin Public Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, extended hours on Friday from 10 a.m. – 9 p.m., 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 1 p.m. – 6 p.m. on Sunday. Family friendly activities and water will be provided on site. The library is located at 18878 SW Martinazzi Avenue. TriMet route numbers: 76, 96 and 97 plus WES
  • Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District, Athletic Center will be open from 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 10 p.m. on Saturday, and 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. on Sunday. Vending machines and water are available on site. The Athletic Center is located at 15707 SW Walker Road. TriMet route numbers: 59 and 67
  • Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District, Cedar Hills Recreation Center will be open from 5:30 a.m. – 10 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Saturday, and 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Sunday. Vending machines and water are available on site. The Cedar Hills Recreation Center is located at 11640 SW Parkway. TriMet route numbers: 20 and 59
  • Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District, Conestoga Recreation & Aquatic Center will be open from 5:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Vending machines and water are available on site. The Conestoga Recreation & Aquatic Center is located at 9985 SW 125th. TriMet route numbers: 62 and 92
  • Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District, Garden Home Recreation Center will be open from 5:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Saturday, and 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Sunday. Vending machines and water are available on site. The Garden Home Recreation Center is located at 7475 SW Oleson Road. TriMet route number: 45
  • Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District, Elsie Stuhr Center will be open from 7:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. on Saturday. Water is available on site. The Elsie Stuhr Center is located at 5550 SW Hall Blvd.
  • Wilsonville Public Library will be open from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Friday through Saturday, and 1 p.m. – 6p.m. and on Sunday. Water is available on site. The library is located at 8200 SW Wilsonville Road.


Summer: Be Prepared for Weather and Water Hazards
Summer means vacation, outdoor activities, and fun in the sun! It’s a time when families hit the road to visit national parks or distant relatives. The warm months and long days mean that there is plenty of time for baseball games and barbecues. The sultry temperatures practically invite you to take a dip in the pool or ocean.

But don’t let the sunny days and warm nights fool you. Summer also holds significant weather and water hazards. Heat waves can be lengthy and deadly. Lightning deaths are at their peak during the summer. Beach hazards such as rip currents can catch the unprepared. And, it’s the start of thunderstorm season.

This summer, Tigard’s Emergency Management wants to encourage you to be prepared for the following weather and water hazards:

  • Rip Currents/Beach Hazards
  • Drought
  • Air Quality
  • Wildfire
  • Heat
  • Lightning

But you’re not powerless in the face of these hazards. With just a few simple steps, you can become weather-ready. Stay safe this summer: Know your risk, take action and be a force of nature!

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1. Know Your Risk

Being prepared means learning about summer weather and water hazards such as lightning, heat waves, rip currents, wildfires and air quality. Here’s what you need to know:

  • The Pacific Northwest thunderstorm season runs from June 1 through October 31. Thunderstorm hazards come in many forms, including heavy rainfall, inland flooding, high winds, lightning strikes, and rip currents. In 2015, there were 26 lightning fatalities.
  • Heat waves are common across the country during the summer. They are dangerous because the human body cannot cool itself properly when exposed to an extreme combination of heat and humidity.
  • The U.S. Lifesaving Association estimates that more than 100 people each year die in the surf zone waters of the US and that rip currents cause the majority of those fatalities. Rip currents are just one of many beach hazards.
  • Wildfires kill people, destroy homes and burn millions of acres, on average, per year.
  • Air pollution can make it harder for people with asthma and other respiratory diseases to breathe. Children and teens may be more sensitive than adults to the health effects caused by air pollution. According to the EPA, poor air quality is responsible in the U.S. for an estimated 60,000 premature deaths each year.

____________________
2. Take Action

While the weather may be wild, you are not powerless. This summer, prepare for hazards with these simple steps:

  • Plan for shelter: You may have only minutes to find shelter before a thunderstorm strikes. Practice a family drill at least once a year. There is no safe place outside when lightning is in the area. If you hear thunder, you are likely within striking distance of the storm. Just remember, When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors.
  • Protect yourself from extreme heat by rescheduling outdoor activities to earlier in the day.
  • Stay safe from rip currents and other beach hazards by only swimming at a beach with lifeguards and heed their direction. Learn how to survive a rip current.
  • When swimming in the local rivers, be aware of the water temperature and current. No matter your swimming ability, everyone should consider a life preserver.
  • If you live near wildland areas, make sure your home is fire-wise and fire-safe. Also determine evacuation routes from your home. Visit weather.gov to determine if your area is at risk for dangerous fire conditions.
  • Whether on foot or in a car, if you encounter flash flood waters, Turn Around, Don’t Drown!
  • Check the Air Quality Index at http://airnow.gov. If the air quality is poor, avoid prolonged or extreme exertion outdoors.
  • Do you live, work or play on the coast? If so, prepare for a tsunami by learning about tsunami warnings and how to plan for an evacuation.

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3. Be a Force of Nature

Your action can inspire others. Be a Force of Nature and share how you’re working to stay safe from weather and water hazards this summer.

  • Write a post on Facebook. Share with your friends and family the preparedness steps you’re taking to stay safe this summer.
  • Create a Family Communication Plan so that your loved ones know how to get in touch during an emergency. Encourage friends and family to create a similar plan.
  • Look for ways to help your town prepare, such as volunteering or joining a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT).

With these steps, you’ll be doing more than just protecting yourself —you’ll help Tigard build a weather-ready community.

Earthquake Preparedness

Earthquake Preparedness
Do you know what to do when the ground begins to shake? Here’s a quick primer: 

Drop Cover Hold

If you’re indoors, drop, cover, and hold on:

  • Drop to the floor.
  • Take cover under a desk, table or other sturdy furniture that’s positioned away from windows, fireplaces, wood stoves, and heavy furniture or appliances that may fall during the shaking.
  • Hold onto your “cover” furniture and be prepared to move with it; remain here until the shaking stops.

If you’re outside:

  • Go to an open area where you’re out of the way of falling debris; remain here until the shaking stops.
  • If driving, pull to the side of the road and remain stopped until the quake is over.

Once the shaking stops: 

  • Shut off gas, water and electricity if lines are damaged.
  • Assume all downed power lines are live and steer clear.
  • Tune in to the radio or TV for instructions from emergency providers.
  • Use phones only for life-threatening emergencies.
  • Expect and be ready for aftershocks.

Pet Preparedness

Do you have an emergency plan for your pets? 
Pet PreparednessYour home is not only a safe haven for your family, but also for your pets. When disaster strikes, people often have no other option than to leave their homes. Depending on the severity of the disaster, you may be away from your home for a few hours or a few months. So what happens to the furry, four-legged members of your family? Here are some tips to help you prepare. 

  • Take time now to identify potential shelter sites or other safe havens where your pet could be housed temporarily. Many emergency shelters do not allow pets.
  • Make sure your pet wears a tag with up-to-date information. Your pet’s ID tag should contain his name, owner contact information, and any urgent medical conditions. Other ID items include license and vaccination tags, or microchip IDs.
  • Prepare a pet evacuation kit containing a pet carrier, collar, leash, harness, bedding, food/water dishes, medications, toys, pet first aid kit, and at least a three-day supply of food and water.
  • It’s always preferable to take your pet with you in an emergency, but if you must leave your pet behind:
    • Put him in a secure area in your home.
    • Leave him at least 10 days of dry food and several water dishes.
    • Place signs on doors and windows describing the type and number of pets inside and providing owner contact information.
  • Be prepared to describe your pet; having a photo of your pet can be especially helpful in reuniting pets and their owners.

Volcano Preparedness

VolcanoWould you know what to do if our area were exposed to volcanic ash? 
In our community, the most likely outcome of a nearby volcanic eruption would be falling ash. Ash is made up of small, sharp pieces of rock and glass. It is hard, abrasive, mildly corrosive, conducts electricity when wet, and does not dissolve in water. 

  • If you have a respiratory ailment, avoid contact with any amount of ash.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Use goggles and/or wear eyeglasses instead of contact lenses.
  • Use a dust mask or hold a damp cloth over your face to help with breathing.
  • Stay away from areas downwind from the volcano to avoid volcanic ash.
  • Tune in to the radio or TV for the latest emergency information. Be aware that in extreme cases, falling ash can disrupt communications.
  • Close doors, windows, and exterior openings like chimney vents.
  • Stay indoors until the ash has settled unless there is a danger of roof collapse. (Two-and-one-half-inches of ash can collapse a roof.)
  • Turn off and cover (if possible) ventilation devices like furnaces, air conditioners, and fans.
  • Avoid driving unless absolutely necessary. Driving can stir up ash that can clog, damage and stall engines. If you must drive, keep your speed below 35 mph.
  • Remember to help your neighbors, especially those who may require special assistance—infants, the elderly and people with disabilities.

 

Contact
Mike Lueck
Emergency Management Coordinator
503-718-2593
mikel@tigard-or.gov 
Related Links


American Red Cross - National
LINK

American Red Cross - Cascades Region
LINK

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
LINK

FEMA Region X
LINK

International Association of Emergency Managers
LINK

Office of Consolidated Emergency Management for Washington County
LINK

Oregon Emergency Management
LINK

Oregon Emergency Management Association
LINK

Oregon Humane Society
LINK

Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue
LINK

Homeowners Insurance Reviews
LINK

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